Why Meek Mill is criminally underrated

So many times I thought it was the end of Meek Mill as a credible rapper. Famous incidents like his beef with hip-hop all-star Drake and MMG label-mate Wale have led to situations where I though he’d get blown out the water and forgotten about.

Yet time after time, Meek rises like a phoenix from the flames and comes through with stellar projects such as DC4 and Wins and Losses.

Controversial, confrontational and abrasive, Mill has continually thrown shots at people and been shot back at. His storied legal history has been well documented and his prison sentence would’ve held back countless artists. Not Meek Mill though.

The memes he was hit with following Drake’s Back to Back diss track could’ve put him in a position where no one would ever take him seriously again. Sure, he was a trending topic for a while as the “take this L” thing caught off and he looked out for the count. But his rebuttals were all criminally overlooked and I’d even argue his responses matched Back to Back or even bettered it.

Post-Drake beef life has been good for Meek, he seems to have recovered a lot of his reputation, settled down and hasn’t had a lawsuit for what feels like forever. His last two full length projects have been excellent and his lyrical prowess continues to be undeniable.

People like to shut down Meek as an ignorant rapper with gang-heavy bars but with a past like his, what would you expect? It would be hard to take him seriously if his music didn’t reflect the narrative of his life. Besides, he has his more poignant, introspective side too with hard-hitting songs such as Young Black America and Heavy Heart. He is seriously undervalued as a lyricist and his freestyle skills are up there with the elite few in the hip-hop world who can still go in off the top.

His uncomfortably public break-up with Nicki Minaj was awkward for everyone involved as she immediately took Drake’s side in what was seemingly a closed case until she attempted to reignite it on the Young Money reunion No Frauds. However, when asked about the lines (“‘Back to Back’? Me and Drizzy laughed at that”) in a radio interview, Meek was respectful and dodged saying anything too untoward about either Drake or Minaj. The Philadelphia-native seems to have matured a lot in the last few years and he appears to want no issues with rap heavyweights like he used to.

Throughout his career, Meek has been put on tracks with some of hip-hop’s big hitters like Jay-Z, Nas and even Jadakiss. Despite being placed beside some of rap’s undeniable legends, Mill has always held his own and in some cases (2012’s Maybach Curtains with Nas where he channeled The Notorious B.I.G. to deliver an excellent verse) topped the big names. This alone should put Meek on a pedestal with some of hip-hop music’s young kings.

Somehow though, it feels like he’s still a laughing stock. Twitter loves to laugh when Meek stands on metaphorical rakes – there has definitely been a few. But when you look at the actual problems Meek has run into, actually most of them have troubled a large percentage of the internet’s favourite artists.

A lot of guys who are frequently placed in the top-five current rappers conversation and the like can’t make full length projects like Meek can. Most of the artists placed above Meek can’t touch his freestyling ability. More to the point, Meek has been better than a lot of internet darlings on the same song as them.

For all these reasons (and I’m sure a lot more), you have to think that most of the rap community clown Meek unfairly. He’s an easy target, the jokes are there for the taking but you can’t discredit his artistry and ability to overcome obstacles that a lot of other rappers throughout history have succumbed to.

#BBAR #BoomBapisBack #BoomBapAndAcidRap

 

Twitter – @peter_tomlinson / @boombapacidrap

 

Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/boombapandacidrap

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The Boom Bap and Acid Rap 2016 Year End Awards, Pt. 5

DJ OF THE YEAR:

THE SHORTLIST:

  • DJ KHALED
  • DJ MUSTARD
  • DJ ESCO
  • DJ DRAMA

 

THE WINNER:

  • DJ KHALEDdj-k

It would only make sense, wouldn’t it? Mustard had his moment, but in the last year DJ Khaled has become a parody of himself. Going viral almost daily with his Snapchat escapades, including the birth of his child (while listening to his own music, of course), getting lost at sea on his jet ski (tail-end of last year, I know, but hilarious nonetheless) and of course the groundbreaking release of his ninth studio album, Major Key, which had a who’s who of hip-hop for a feature list. From Nas, Jay Z, Busta Rhymes and Fat Joe to Drake, Kendrick Lamar, Future and YG, Khaled got them all. Behind all the buffoonery, DJ Khaled is actually one of the best DJs in the world and should be respected musically. Laugh all you want, he’s doing the same. All the way to the bank.

PRODUCER OF THE YEAR:

THE SHORTLIST:

  • MIKE WILL MADE-IT
  • SOUNWAVE
  • METRO BOOMIN
  • MIKE DEAN

 

THE WINNER:

  • METRO BOOMINmetro

 

Young Metro has done the rounds. Active since 2010, he’s only gotten better and is still only 23. With producing credits for the likes of Kanye West, Future, Young Thug, Collegrove, The Weeknd, Drake and Gucci Mane as well a joint project with 21 Savage entitled Savage Mode, 2016 has been one hell of a year for Metro. He’ll tell you himself his best work is yet to come. And if he doesn’t trust you, stay well clear of Future.

 

The Boom Bap and Acid Rap 2016 Year End Awards

2016 has been an upside down year across the board. We’re talking losing greats such as Prince and Bowie and of course Phife Dawg. We’re talking police brutality happening throughout the world. We’re talking Brexit, numerous terrorist attacks and Trump as president for crying out loud.

Musically, however, it has been one of the most distinctive years in recent memory. We had new verses from OGs like Nas, Jay Z and Andre 3000 and albums from GOATs like A Tribe Called Quest and De La Soul. On the other hand, emerging forces like Migos, 21 Savage and Lil Yachty had their best years to date. The stars we’re accustomed to came back looking strong too, with stellar projects from The Game, Kendrick Lamar, Kanye West, Drake and so many more. It’s fair to say that the hip-hop of 2016 helped us to escape from the real world for a bit at times.

Here’s the first installation of the Boom Bap and Acid Rap 2016 Year End Awards!

VIDEO OF THE YEAR:

THE SHORTLIST:

  • YOUNG THUG (feat. QUAVO) – F CANCER
  • LIL YACHTY – 1NIGHT
  • FRENCH MONTANA (feat. NAS & KANYE WEST) – FIGURE IT OUT
  • SCHOOLBOY Q (feat. KANYE WEST) – THAT PART
  • 2 CHAINZ – WATCH OUT
  • FRENCH MONTANA (feat. DRAKE) – NO SHOPPING
  • SKEPTA – THE MAN

THE WINNER:

  • SCHOOLBOY Q (feat. KANYE WEST) – THAT PART

Despite stiff competition from two very different French Montana efforts, a hilarious 2 Chainz video and the characteristically weird Young Thug ‘F Cancer’ among others, Top Dawg’s resident gangster from Hoover Street wins this category by the skin of his grillz. The Colin Tilley-directed video features Q getting dropped off at Kanye’s house, before West stumbles around the house in one take, wildly rapping lines such as “walkin’, livin’ legend, man I feel like Kobe”. All the nominations are worth a watch but this video is just so trippy and captivating, it would be hard to give this award to anything else.

SIDENOTE:

The worst video of the year, if you’re interested, was comfortably Macklemore, Ryan Lewis, Anderson .Paak and Idris Elba’s ‘Dance Off’, which made close to 9 million people cringe on YouTube this year. If you can sit through this, you can sit through anything. Don’t be surprised if this track pops up again…